STEM

Science, Technology, Engineering, Math

Pre-College students in a biomed computer lab

GW’s state-of-the-art Science and Engineering Hall (SEH), coupled with GW’s distinguished faculty, provide a unique opportunity to study STEM courses in the nation’s capital.

The new engineering building includes high-tech laboratory space and facilities, such as a biomedical imaging lab. In addition, you will have the chance to interact with Washington, D.C.’s active science and engineering community to create an unforgettable summer learning experience.

All course offerings are subject to cancellation.

One-Week Summer Exposure (noncredit)

Cybersecurity: Exploring Risks and Unlocking Solutions

Non-credit bearing academic class icon  Noncredit

One-week course icon  One-week program

 Calendar Icon  July 14—19, 2019

In the age of technology, the question stands: how secure are our systems? In this course, students will tackle that question through a highly technical, hands-on curriculum to learn the ins and outs of cyber challenges. Students will be able to merge research with current techniques and tools relating to cybersecurity.

Student and Course Assistant looking over a computer

Two-Week Summer Immersion (noncredit)

Introduction to Medicine I

An "A" with a line marked through it Noncredit

the number two Two-week program

icon of a calendar  June 30— July 12, 2019

The world of medicine is complex and profound. This course will introduce students to the didactic rigors of biology, genetics, physiology and anatomy as well teaching them the applications of these topics in clinical research and global health. The course will feature site visits to places such as the National Institute of Health and the Pan American Health Organization.

Introduction to Medicine Students at National Institute of Health

Robotics: Machines in Motion

An "A" with a line marked through it Noncredit

the number two Two-week program

icon of a calendar  June 30— July 12, 2019

Robotics is an increasingly popular interdisciplinary branch of engineering that integrates mechanical and electrical engineering, as well as computer science technologies to develop machines that transform all sectors of daily life. In this course, students learn computer programming to develop a practical understanding of robotic engineering, and to familiarize themselves with the software, electronics hardware, motors and sensors of behavioral programming concepts.

Robotics student building robot in class lab

Bioethics: Medical and Health Ethics

Noncredit

The number "2" Two-week program

calendar icon  June 30— July 12, 2019

Is it ethical to clone a person solely to harvest their organs for the purpose of organ donations? This course explores legal, ethical, and policy issues that arise in the biomedical arena, addressing controversial and challenging questions such as, the definitions of life and death, the nature of personal identity, the requirements of justice, and the boundaries of liberty.

Students with lecturer learning about facial deformities

Introduction to Medicine II

An "A" with a line marked through it Noncredit

the number two Two-week program

icon of a calendar  July 14 — 26, 2019

The world of medicine is complex and profound. This course will introduce students to the didactic rigors of biology, genetics, physiology and anatomy as well teaching them the applications of these topics in clinical research and global health. The course will feature site visits to places such as the National Institute of Health and the Pan American Health Organization.

Introduction to Medicine Students at National Institute of Health

Software Engineering and Programming

Noncredit

the number two Two-week program

calendar icon  July 14—26, 2019

At the touch of a fingertip, mobile applications provide us with unprecedented access to information and tools that cater to our daily lives. Basic computer programming and coding remain the foundation on which these software applications are built. This course introduces students to programming languages, coding software and the elements of designing functional mobile applications for future smartphones and tablets.

Students in a computer lab

Crime Scene Investigation: DC

Noncredit

the number two Two-week program

calendar icon  July 14—26, 2019

In this course, students focus on the fundamentals of investigating elaborate crime scenes and apply state-of-the-art forensic science principles in simulated experiences. Students will be introduced to the critical skills and abilities necessary for future careers such as: investigators, detectives, lawyers, special agents, medico-legal death investigators, crime scene technicians and forensic pathologists.

Photo of student inspecting a mock crime scene

Cognitive Neuroscience

Noncredit

the number two Two-week program

calendar icon  July 14—26, 2019

This course introduces students to the science of the brain, including areas of perception, attention and memory, with an emphasis on the role of health and behavior. Students will explore psychiatric disorders and research methods among patient-based testing, psychophysical scaling and animal modeling.

Photo of students in a neuroscience class

Biomedical Engineering

The letter "A" with a slash through it Noncredit

the number two Two-week program

calendar icon  July 28—August 9, 2019

The combination of engineering and medicine has profoundly changed the quality of life for our society. In this course, students will investigate topics such as electrophysiology, medical imaging, therapeutic ultrasound, computer-aided diagnosis, biomedical sensor technology and nanotechnology, in order to conceptualize the future of biomedical advancements.

Students in a biomedical lab

Introduction to Public Health

Noncredit

the number two Two-week program

calendar icon  July 28—August 9, 2019

The next epidemic could wipe out millions in days. Public health scientists are at the frontline to prevent and curtail effects of negative health on populations. This course will serve as an introduction to aspects of public health and health services. Students will delve into topics of health services administration while critically analyzing applications of public health in historical and modern trends in public health nationally and internationally.

Students listening to a presentation by Doctors

College Intensive (credit)

Introduction to Engineering

Three credits

the number three Three-week program

  June 30—July 19, 2019

This course introduces students to the various disciplines within engineering and applied sciences: biomedical engineering, electrical and computer engineering, civil and environmental engineering, computer science, mechanical and aerospace engineering and systems engineering. The course will consist of two to three modules focused on specific disciplines. Students will be exposed to engineering problem solving methodology enabled by data measurements, data collection, computational modeling and analysis.

Photo of students in an engineering lab

ANTH 1001: Biological Anthropology (4 credits)

Four credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon July 1—August 10, 2019

Survey of human evolution, genetics and physical variation, and primatology. Includes Regular laboratory exercises and Laboratory fee.

ASTR 1001: Stars, Planets, and Life in the Universe (Four Credits)

Four credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon July 1—August 10, 2019

Primarily for non-science majors. An introduction to how our Universe is structured, including the basic principles underlying astronomical systems and observations. Topics include the known laws of nature, stars, and planetary systems and the conditions for extraterrestrial life and exploration. Laboratory fee.

Prerequisite: High School level Algebra.

BISC 1005: The Biology of Nutrition and Health

 Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon July 1—August 10, 2019

A study of the human body and food-related health issues through the examination of the nutritional needs of the human body, digestion, genetics, and life experiences/exposures. Laboratory fee. 

CHEM 1003: Contemporary Science for Non-science Majors

 Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon July 1—August 10, 2019

Contemporary topics in physical, biological, and medical science. Laboratory fee. 

CHEM 1111: General Chemistry I (Four Credits)

 Four credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon July 1—August 10, 2019

Atomic structure and properties; stoichiometry; gas, liquid, and solid state; chemical bonding; solutions; chemical kinetics and equilibria; thermodynamics; acids and bases; electrochemistry; descriptive chemistry. Laboratory fee.

Prerequisite: Students with one year of High School Algebra.

CSCI 1011: Introduction to Programming with Java

 Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon July 1—August 10, 2019

An introductory course in programming a computer, using the Java language. Object-oriented programming, classes, applets, methods, control structures, inheritance, overriding, GUI widgets, containers, and exceptions.

GEOL 1001: Physical Geology

 Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon July 1—August 10, 2019

Lecture, laboratory. An introduction to the principal features of the composition and structure of the earth. Topics include the nature of minerals and rocks, surface and deep earth processes, mineral and energy resources, and plate tectonics. Laboratory fee. 

GEOL 1005: Environmental Geology

 Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon July 1—August 10, 2019

An introduction to the impact of geology on the environment, with emphasis on the relation of people and society to natural environments; population evolution, natural hazards, and mineral resources. Laboratory fee. Includes lecture and laboratory.

MATH 1007. Mathematics and Politics

 Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon July 1—August 10, 2019

A mathematical treatment of fair representation, voting systems, power, and conflict; impossibility theorems of Balinski and Young and of Arrow; the electoral college; the prisoner’s dilemma.

MATH 1252: Calculus for the Social and Management Sciences

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon July 1—August 10, 2018

Differential and integral calculus of functions of one variable; applications to business and economics.

Prerequisites: Qualifying results on the GW Mathematics placement examination or a score of 720 or above on the SAT II in mathematics. Applicants must submit proof of completion of prerequisites. Faculty review and approval is required. Please contact us for more information.

MATH 1051: Finite Mathematics for the Social and Management Sciences

 Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon July 1—August 10, 2019

Systems of linear equations, matrix algebra, linear programming, probability theory, and mathematics of finance. 

Prerequisites: Qualifying results on the GW Mathematics placement examination or a score of 720 or above on the SAT II. Applicants must submit proof of completion of prerequisites. Faculty review and approval is required. Please contact us for more information.

MATH 1220: Calculus with Precalculus I

 Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon July 1—August 10, 2019

An introduction to single-variable calculus (differentiation and integration of algebraic and trigonometric functions with applications), with the concepts and techniques of precalculus developed as needed.

Prerequisites: Qualifying results on the GW Mathematics placement examination or a score of 720 or above on the SAT II. Applicants must submit proof of completion of prerequisites. Faculty review and approval is required. Please contact us for more information.

MATH 1231: Single-Variable Calculus I

 Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon July 1—August 10, 2019

Limits and continuity; differentiation and integration of algebraic and trigonometric functions with applications.

Prerequisites: Qualifying results on the GW Mathematics placement examination or a score of 720 or above on the SAT II. Applicants must submit proof of completion of prerequisites. Faculty review and approval is required. Please contact us for more information.

PHYS 1011: General Physics I (Four Credits)

 Four credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon July 1—August 10, 2019

Atomic structure and properties; stoichiometry; gas, liquid, and solid state; chemical bonding; solutions; chemical kinetics and equilibria; thermodynamics; acids and bases; electrochemistry; descriptive chemistry. Laboratory fee.

Prerequisite: Students with one year of High School Trigonometry.

STAT 1051: Introduction to Business and Economic Statistics

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon July 1—August 10, 2019

Frequency distributions, descriptive measures, probability, probability distributions, sampling, estimation, tests of hypotheses, regression and correlation, with applications to business.

The course includes a Lecture (3 hours) and laboratory (1 hour).

STAT 1053: Introduction to Statistics in Social Science

 Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon July 1—August 10, 2019

Frequency distributions, descriptive measures, probability, sampling, estimation, tests of hypotheses, regression and correlation, with applications to social sciences. Includes a lecture(3 hours) and laboratory (1 hour).

BISC 1005: The Biology of Nutrition & Health

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: July 1—August 10, 2019

A study of the human body and food-related health issues through the examination of the nutritional needs of the human body, digestion, genetics, and life experiences/exposures. Laboratory fee.

CSCI 1111: Introduction to Software Development

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: July 1—August 10, 2019

Introduction to the solution of problems on a digital computer using the Java language. Object-oriented programming concepts; documentation techniques; design of test data. Writing, debugging, and running programs in an interactive computing environment.

EHS 2211: Introduction to Telemedicine

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: July 1—August 10, 2019

An introduction to the ethical, legal, and technical aspects of telemedicine, including, but not limited to, emerging technologies, planning and operational considerations. Students complete a number of practical exercises requiring direct application and utilization of the Internet, video, audio, and other technologies.

GEOG 2104: Introduction to Cartography and GIS

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: July 1—August 10, 2019

Fundamentals of cartography; geographic data structure and information systems. Laboratory fee.

HLWL 1106: Drug Awareness

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: July 1—August 10, 2019

Analysis of the complex role that drugs play in contemporary society and the ethical, legal, socioeconomic, and health issues that surround their therapeutic and recreational use.

HLWL 1109: Human Sexuality

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: July 1—August 10, 2019

Biological and developmental aspects of human sexuality; psychological and emotional aspects of sexual behavior; sexual identity; social forces affecting sexual issues; and research trends in the area of human sexuality.

HLWL 1114: Personal Health and Wellness

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: July 1—August 10, 2019

Survey of the various components involved in personal health and wellness, such as personal fitness, sexuality, mental health, and environmental health; application of knowledge through the use of decision making and behavior modification skills.

MATH 1008: History of Mathematics

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: July 1—August 10, 2019

The history of mathematics, with emphasis on its importance in the evolution of human thought. Students learn some useful mathematics from areas such as geometry, number theory, and probability and develop an appreciation of the mathematical endeavor.

MATH 1231: Single-Variable Calculus I

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: July 1—August 10, 2019

An introduction to single-variable calculus (differentiation and integration of algebraic and trigonometric functions with applications), with the concepts and techniques of precalculus developed as needed.

Prerequisites: Qualifying results on the GW Mathematics placement examination or a score of 720 or above on the SAT II. Applicants must submit proof of completion of prerequisites. Faculty review and approval is required. Please contact us for more information.

SPHR 1071: Foundations of Human Communication

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: July 1—August 10, 2019

An introduction to the fundamental principles of the biology of speech, hearing and language, language structure and use, and human communicative interaction. Practice in the identification of specific verbal and nonverbal aspects of communication behavior.

STAT 1051: Introduction to Business and Economic Statistics

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: July 1—August 10, 2019

Lecture (3 hours), laboratory (1 hour). Frequency distributions, descriptive measures, probability, probability distributions, sampling, estimation, tests of hypotheses, regression and correlation, with applications to business.

STAT 1053: Introduction to Statistics in Social Science

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: July 1—August 10, 2019

Lecture (3 hours), laboratory (1 hour). Frequency distributions, descriptive measures, probability, sampling, estimation, tests of hypotheses, regression and correlation, with applications to social sciences.