Leadership

A student speaking at a podium in front of other students and adults.

Effective leadership is essential in order to make a meaningful impact. GW has a long history of preparing leaders to influence change in nonprofit, government, local community, and corporate settings.

Our Pre-College courses help high school students learn the principles of effective leadership by leveraging the resources of Washington, D.C. and the expert faculty at GW. Students will have opportunities to see successful leadership exemplified firsthand, and will leave our program ready to make a difference in their own communities.

On-campus and online courses are available for credit, while our noncredit offerings focus on experiential learning environments, connecting students with relevant institutions and experts in their respective fields.

All course offerings are subject to cancellation.

One-Week Summer Exposure (noncredit)

Social Justice and Activism

Non-credit bearing academic class icon  Noncredit

One-week course icon  One-week program

 Calendar Icon  July 14—19, 2019

Washington, D.C. is the heart of the legislative processes and social movements that influence structural, cultural and ideological change. This course introduces students to questions, opportunities and roadblocks faced by civic and global leaders while aiming to expand their leadership capacity teaching them to translate their values and ideas into action. Students explore topics such as grass root organization activism works by looking at Washington DC and how activism in DC and elsewhere has shaped social change.

Social Justice Students on tour of the US Capitol Building

Cybersecurity: Exploring Risks and Unlocking Solutions

Non-credit bearing academic class icon  Noncredit

One-week course icon  One-week program

 Calendar Icon  July 14—19, 2019

People shop, play, work, and socialize online - in fact, our modern lives are online. This course explores cybersecurity and privacy issues impacting individuals, businesses, organizations, and government agencies. Students will explore a basic understanding of business, management, legal, technical, and ethical issues and challenges faced in our contemporary times. Topics of discussion include medical device privacy, social privacy, data breaches, and online scams. Students will grapple with questions like: Can someone else use my private pictures without permission? What can I do to protect my identity from being stolen? all while engaging in creative projects, meeting with industry professionals, and visiting government agencies. 

Student and Course Assistant looking over a computer

Introduction to Digital Marketing

Non-credit bearing academic class icon  Noncredit

One-week course icon  One-week program

 Calendar Icon  July 14—19, 2019

How does a company sell a product or create their brand? In this course, students will grapple with the social, cultural, and psychological factors that influence consumer behaviors. Through acquiring skills of market research, students will analyze models of buyer behavior and consumption patterns to desire their own marketing project.

Digital marketing students at the computer lab

Two-Week Summer Immersion (noncredit)

Bioethics: Medical and Health Ethics

Noncredit

The number "2" Two-week program

calendar icon  June 30— July 12, 2019

Is it ethical to clone a person solely to harvest their organs for the purpose of organ donations? This course explores legal, ethical, and policy issues that arise in the biomedical arena, addressing controversial and challenging questions such as, the definitions of life and death, the nature of personal identity, the requirements of justice, and the boundaries of liberty.

Students with lecturer learning about facial deformities

Hospitality Management

Noncredit

The number "2" Two-week program

calendar icon  June 30— July 12, 2019

In a global market, tourism continues to serve as a major market economy. Students in Tourism and Hospitality management engage with the trends of the tourism and hospitality industry. Students will learn the basic principles of planning and managing tourism resources and introduce themselves to the financial monitoring of hospitality and leisure services.

Students presenting to classmates

Political Communication

Noncredit

the number two Two-week program

calendar icon  July 14—26, 2019

Washington, D.C. allows students to study the interplay of media, public affairs and politics. In this course, students will critically investigate and explore the role media plays in civic and political life. They will also focus on understanding communication, news production, media law, history and ethics through analytical, critical thinking and leadership skills that allow our students access to how to use media and new information technology to create and deliver the right information to the right audience at the right time.

Young female student participating in a mock trial

College Intensive (credit)

Caminos al Futuro

Three credits

the number three Three-week program

  June 30—July 19, 2019

  Scholarship Opportunity

Caminos al Futuro is a fully funded, selective pre-college and residential summer program for rising seniors in U.S. high schools in academic leadership development. Caminos al Futuro seeks to cultivate leadership potential and scholarship in students who desire to shape issues impacting Hispanic and Latino communities.

Photo of Caminos students in front of the US Capitol building

INSPIRE Program

Three credits

the number three Three-week program

  June 30—July 19, 2019

  Scholarship Opportunity

The INSPIRE program is a full scholarship open to Native American, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian rising junior and senior high school students who want to learn about intergovernmental relations between tribal governments and the federal government.

INSPIRE students in front of the Supreme Court building

PSTD 1010: Introduction to Peace Studies and Conflict Resolution

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon July 1—August 10, 2019

Major thinkers and themes in the field of peace studies and conflict resolution. Focus on philosophical and religious foundations of peace and justice movements in the twentieth century. Examination of peace and conflict through an interdisciplinary lens and on personal, local, and international levels.

HIST 1310: Introduction to American History until 1876

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: July 1—August 10, 2019

The political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States. From the earliest settlements to 1876.

HIST 1311: Introduction to American History (1876-Present)

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: July 1—August 10, 2019

The political, social, economic, and cultural history of the United States. From 1876 to present.

HIST 2340: U.S. Diplomatic History

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: July 1—August 10, 2019

American foreign relations in the twentieth century.

HSSJ 2160: Role of NGOs in International Humanitarian Assistance

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: July 1—August 10, 2019

The increasing role of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) as providers of service and care for vulnerable individuals and communities in need; development of NGOs, the place they hold in international interventions, and the types of services they provide.

PHIL 2045: Introduction to Logic

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: July 1—August 10, 2019

Introduction to informal logic, scientific argument, and formal logic. The informal logic component focuses on the fallacies of reasoning and practical applications of logic. The formal logic component focuses on translation from English into propositional logic, truth tables, and proofs in propositional logic.

PHIL 2131: Ethics: Theory and Applications

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: July 1—August 10, 2019

Examination of leading ethical theories (e.g., utilitarianism, deontology, virtue ethics), and methodology in ethics. Engagement with contemporary problems.

SOC 1003: Introduction to Criminal Justice

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: July 1—August 10, 2019

An introduction to the study of criminal justice. The historical development of criminal justice and its evolution into modern legal systems. The impact of different forms of criminal justice on society and the individual.