Law & Politics

Pre-College students outside the US Supreme Court

Surrounded by the nation’s political activity, GW is the perfect place to study the inner workings of the United States’ legislative system.

The university draws on its rich resources and connections to provide dynamic courses in government, politics, law and ethics.

On-campus and online courses are available for credit, while our noncredit offerings focus on experiential learning environments, connecting students with large institutions and experts in their respective fields.

All course offerings are subject to cancellation.

  • Political Communication
    The White House

    Political Communication

    Jon Ebinger, the instructor for this course, was recently appointed to spearhead an Atlantic Coast Pipeline reporting project. Ebinger is an experienced Washington, D.C.-based news producer and editor who worked for years with ABC News Nightline. Later, while working with ESPN, he launched the weekly investigative program,"Outside the Lines," and led the show's production team. Ebinger has been honored with eight Emmy Awards, including six national news Emmys with "Nightline" (ABC News).

     

    Apply now for the program

One-Week Summer Exposure (noncredit)

Non-credit bearing academic class icon  Noncredit

One-week course icon  One-week program

 Calendar Icon  July 12—17, 2020

It takes a village to plan and execute a political campaign. Without a highly skilled and dedicated campaign staff, even the most qualified candidate’s chance of being elected is slim to none. Students will explore the power of organized rhetorical strategy can take a politician from the ballot to Office, exploring the range of strategies and professional positions involved from the start of the race to election day.

Students walking at the Washington Monument

Two-Week Summer Immersion (noncredit)

Noncredit

The number "2" Two-week program

calendar icon  June 28— July 10, 2020

The globalization of economic, political, social and cultural activity has increased society’s need for international understanding and cooperation. This course will expose students to viewpoints and perspectives of foreign policymakers and explore multilateral approaches to international issues. Students will gain a basic understanding of how to analyze and articulate foreign policy.

Photo of students at the Institute of Peace in D.C.

Noncredit

the number two Two-week program

calendar icon  July 12—24, 2020

How do space militarization, nuclear weapons, and climate change impact an international phenomenon such as terrorism? These issues and many others are all governed by international laws, ratified treaties, and United Nations resolutions. In this course, students will employ an interactive, hands-on methodology by visiting Elliott School institutes on campus and attending off-campus briefings with experts in the field. Students will learn the principles of global governance and mediation, discover how the many different subfields of international law fit into the discipline of international affairs, think critically about the various topics, and make individual contributions within a cooperative approach.

Photo of students at a lecture at the National Archives

Noncredit

the number two Two-week program

calendar icon  July 12—24, 2020

Public policy is the way in which public issues are addressed by modifying existing laws and regulations or creating new ones altogether. In this course, students will think strategically, creatively and critically about current issues shaping the public debate, and learn to analyze and evaluate policies and programs in pursuit of public interest.

Students with a view of the US Capitol building

Noncredit

the number two Two-week program

calendar icon  July 26—August 7, 2020

In this course, students will learn about the legal system including the trial process and advocating for clients. In addition, students will learn areas of law impacting young adults such as contract, civil, and personal property law. Students will engage in the legal community by meeting with attorneys and attending court cases in Washington, D.C. Students will also explore legal ethics and the role lawyers play in the justice system. Students will engage in site visits such as the Supreme Court, State Department, and many legal organizations. This course is intended to provide an in-depth look at the practice of law.

 
A student participating in a mock trial.

Noncredit

the number two Two-week program

calendar icon  July 26—August 7, 2020

Washington, D.C. is the hub of U.S. national security. This course introduces students to the relationship between national security and policymaking. Students will visit the country's top intelligence organizations and learn about the complexities of the U.S. national security agenda from perspectives of the legislative, executive and judicial branches, and the impact of national security practices by the U.S. Marshals, the Department of State, the Department of Homeland Security and the division of U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

Photo of student at the State Department podium

College Intensive (credit)

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: May 18—June 27, 2020

Structure, powers, and processes of the American political system and the impact on public policy.

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: May 18—June 27, 2020

Analysis of world politics, focusing on the role of nation-states and international organizations and on selected foreign policy issues.

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: May 18—June 27, 2020

The history of science and technology and their role in political and social life from the late 19th century to the present.

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: May 18—June 27, 2020

Nature of political inquiry, approaches to the study of politics and government, empirical methods of research.

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: May 18—June 27, 2020

The formal institutions that structure criminal justice systems viewed in a sociological and political context. Contemporary American practices and policies that define crime and responses to it, including criminal law, criminology, policing, and penology.

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: May 18—June 27, 2020

Concepts and principles of comparative analysis, with an examination of politics and government in selected countries.

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: June 29—August 8, 2020

The history of science and technology and their role in political and social life from the late 19th century to the present.

Three credits

the number six Six-week program

calendar icon Online Course: June 29—August 8, 2020

Key aspects of the literature on public opinion, with emphasis on the role of media in opinion formation and change. Topics include the meaning of public opinion in a democratic society, a review of methods used to measure opinions, and media effects on opinion.