Session 2

Two-week Programs

Summer Immersion is a full-day, rigorous noncredit program for rising sophomores, juniors and seniors. Participants enroll in programs that integrate lectures with experiential and applied activities. Students expand and deepen their knowledge of a topic through collaborative learning and an exploration of the diverse intellectual and cultural resources of Washington, D.C.

For more information on campus life, commuter options, a sample schedule and resources available to students, see the Student Resources & Activities page.

All course offerings are subject to change or cancellation.

Photos of students with a member of the bomb squad

Crime, Justice & Corrections

Noncredit

number two Two-week program

calendar icon  July 1—13, 2018

In Washington, D.C., students are in close proximity to the greatest concentration of federal crime labs and investigatory agencies in the world. In this course, students will examine the field of criminology through the analysis of processes, procedure and ethics as they learn how to employ these principles.

Students with a medical mannequin used for simulation

Introduction to Medicine

Noncredit

The number "2" Two-week program

calendar icon  July 1—13, 2018

This course will introduce students to the didactic rigors of biology, genetics, physiology and anatomy as well teaching them the applications of these topics in clinical research and global health. The course will feature site visits to places such as the National Institute of Health and the Pan American Health Organization.

Two Pre-College students at a computer

Principles of Real-World Economics

Noncredit

the number "two" Two-week program

calendar icon  July 1—13, 2018

As the world economy continues to become more globally integrated, understanding the keys to economic efficiency and growth is more important than ever. Students in this course will investigate how economic principles translate into real world processes that affect goods and services, market prices, output, unemployment, inflation and the distribution of resources.

A young female student working on a robotic car

Robotics: Machines in Motion

Noncredit

The number "2" Two-week program

calendar icon  July 1—13, 2018

Robotics is an increasingly popular interdisciplinary branch of engineering that integrates mechanical and electrical engineering, as well as computer science technologies to develop machines that transform all sectors of daily life. In this course, students learn computer programming to develop a practical understanding of robotic engineering, and to familiarize themselves with the software, electronics hardware, motors and sensors of behavioral programming concepts.

Pre-college student giving a speech

Social Change & Leadership

Noncredit

The number "2" Two-week program

calendar icon  July 1—13, 2018

Washington, D.C. is the heart of the legislative processes and social movements that influence structural, cultural and ideological change. This course introduces students to questions, opportunities and roadblocks faced by civic and global leaders. It will expand their leadership capacity and teach them to translate their values and ideas into action to create the change they want to see in their communities.

Photo of students at the Washington Nationals ball park.

Sports Management

Noncredit

The number "2" Two-week program

calendar icon  July 1—13, 2018

American sports generate billions of dollars annually. This course explores how teams, stadiums and athletes are managed, covered in media and promoted to maximize every last dollar. Students learn analytical thinking, communication, business and marketing skills while developing a sports organization strategy.

Photo of students at the Institute of Peace in D.C.

U.S. Foreign Policy: Multilateralism

Noncredit

The number "2" Two-week program

calendar icon  July 1—13, 2018

The globalization of economic, political, social and cultural activity has increased society’s need for international understanding and cooperation. This course will expose students to viewpoints and perspectives of foreign policymakers and explore multilateral approaches to international issue.  Students will gain a basic understanding of how to analyze and articulate foreign policy.